The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued final regulations covering tax-free savings accounts that allow people with disabilities and their families to save and pay for disability-related expenses without jeopardizing eligibility for Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and other government benefits. Passed by Congress in December 2014, the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act  allows families…

One of the most important decisions a special needs trust’s donor (the person who supplies the funds for the trust) makes is the choice of a trustee for the trust. A trustee typically manages the day-to-day operations of the trust, often making distributions to the trust’s beneficiary, investing the trust’s assets, and paying the trust’s…

The Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners (TSBSWE) moved to change its code of conduct to allow discrimination against Texans based on their disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity. The Texas Behavioral Health Council (BEHC) is meeting on October 27, and we need you to speak out against this discriminatory move. Take action to…

Those who apply for disability benefits and are initially rejected can appeal, and more times than not they end up winning their case.  But a new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report reveals that due to the years-long backlog of appeals, thousands of applicants for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits are dying or going…

For the past two and a half years, the Trump administration has been pushing states to adopt policies requiring certain Medicaid recipients to work in order to maintain eligibility for benefits. At every step along the way, courts have ruled that such requirements are illegal. Now, the administration is looking to the U.S. Supreme Court for support. The…

The Social Security Administration (SSA) manages the two largest government benefit programs for people with special needs, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Many of the people with special needs who receive these benefits are qualified to manage their own money and can make other financial decisions for themselves. The SSA…

By their very nature, special needs trusts (SNTs) are usually designed to terminate, or at least radically change, when the trust’s primary beneficiary dies. But terminating a special needs trust is not as simple as merely writing a check to the remainder beneficiaries and calling it a day. There are several key considerations and requirements…

Many people believe that if they are single, they don’t need a will or other estate planning documents. But estate planning is just as important for single people as it is for couples and families. Estate planning allows you to ensure that your property will go to the people you want, in the way you want,…

A trust is a legal arrangement through which one person (or an institution, such as a bank or law firm), called a “trustee,” holds legal title to property for another person, called a “beneficiary.” Trusts fall into two basic categories: testamentary and inter vivos. A testamentary trust is one created by your will, and it…

Allocating your personal possessions can be one of the most difficult tasks when creating an estate plan. To avoid family feuds after you are gone, it is important to have a plan and make your wishes clear. When passing on possessions to your heirs, savings and investments are easy to divide up, since they can…

Page 2 of 16 1 2 3 4 16

Communication resulting from use of this web site does not create an attorney-client relationship. You will need to meet with an attorney and sign a separate written retainer agreement.

logo-footer