Your estate will have to pay federal estate taxes if its net value when you die is more than the “exempt” amount at the time. (Your state may also have…

Unlike a will, a trust doesn’t have to die with you. Assets can stay in your trust, managed by the trustee you selected, until your beneficiaries reach the age(s) you…

Successor trustees can be individuals (adult children, other relatives, or trusted friends) and/or a corporate trustee. If you choose an individual, you should also name some additional successors in case…

If you become incapacitated, your successor trustee looks after your care and manages your financial affairs for as long as needed, using your assets to pay your expenses. If you…

A power of attorney gives one or more persons the power to act on your behalf as your agent. The power may be limited to a particular activity, such as…

Age, marital status and wealth don’t really matter. If you own titled assets and want your loved ones (spouse, children or parents) to avoid court interference at your death or…

No, they’ve been used successfully for hundreds of years.

No. A living trust is for financial affairs. A living will is for medical affairs; it lets others know how you feel about life support in terminal situations.

Yes, you need a “pour-over” will that acts as a safety net if you forget to transfer an asset to your trust. When you die, the will “catches” the forgotten…

In many states you can include in your advance directive your preference to become an organ or tissue donor at the time of death. State law varies, and you should…

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